Category: iOS/SDK 4.0.x

Quick Look at iTunes in iCloud in iOS 4.3 [U]

Today Apple announced its brand new service iCloud, as part of iCloud both the iOS App Store and iTunes Store allow purchases of songs, videos and Apps to be downloaded to a new iOS device if they’ve been previously purchased on another device. Immediately following the keynote Apple pushed this out to both stores and is accessible from devices running iOS 4.3.

iCloud beta and Cloud Storage APIs are available immediately to iOS and Mac Developer Program members. iCloud will be available this fall concurrent with iOS 5. Users can sign up for iCloud for free on an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch running iOS 5 or a Mac running Mac OS X Lion with a valid Apple ID. iCloud includes 5GB of free cloud storage for Mail, Document Storage and Backup. Purchased music, apps, books and Photo Stream do not count against the storage limit.

Here is a quick look at iCloud on both the App Store and iTunes Store.

Open the iTunes store on an iOS device running 4.3 and you’ll see a new “Purchased” button in the bottom bar. Clicking that button will show a full purchase history for the signed in Apple ID. A purchase history will be shown for all devices and what’s not on the current device.

Items not on the current device can be downloaded straight to the iOS device at no additional cost.

App Store iCloud on iOS 4.3

The same applies to Apps from the App Store. It is now possible to very quickly install Apps that have been purchased on another iOS device.

Here’s some shots from both stores on the iPad.

iWork Available for iPhone and iPod Touch

iWork for iOS

iWork for iOS

Apple has today announced that its iWork suite of productivity applications is now available for the iPhone and iPod touch via the App Store. iWork which was originally available for the Mac was ported over to iOS for the iPad in 2010 and now iPhone and iPod touch users can install iWork apps too.

“Now you can use Keynote, Pages and Numbers on iPhone and iPod touch to create amazing presentations, documents and spreadsheets right in the palm of your hand,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. “The incredible Retina display, revolutionary Multi-Touch interface and our powerful software make it easy to create, edit, organize and share all of your documents from iPhone 4 or iPod touch.”

Keynote, Pages and Numbers are universal apps that run on iPad and iPad 2, iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4, and iPod touch (3rd & 4th generation). Keynote, Pages and Numbers are available from the App Store for $9.99 each for new users, or as a free update for existing iWork for iPad customers.

Apple Responds to Lodsys Patent Threats

Apple has today stepped into the dispute over In-App purchases which Lodsys claims infringes one of its patents and has asked iOS developers to license it from them. Apple has today sent out information to iOS developers with documentation outlining the Lodsys patent and a letter to Lodsys CEO, Mark Small.

As reported by The Loop in the letter to Small, Bruce Sewell, Apple’s Senior Vice President and General Counsel writes, “Apple is undisputedly licensed to these patents and the App Makers are protected by that license”.

The opening paragraph in the letter to Small reads:

There is no basis for Lodsys’ infringement allegations against Apple’s App Makers. Apple intends to share this letter and the information set out herein with its App Makers and is fully prepared to defend Apple’s license rights.

Apple is asking Lodsys to withdraw its letters to developers asking them to license the patent saying that the letters are a “fundamental misapprehension regarding Apple’s licese and the way Apple’s products work” and that the information provided by Apple should be “sufficient for you to withdraw your outstanding threats to the App Makers”.

Apple explains its license as follows:

Thus, the technology that is targeted in your notice letters is technology that Apple is expressly licensed under the Lodsys patents to offer to Apple’s App Makers. These licensed products and services enable Apple’s App Makers to communicate with end users through use of Apple’s own licensed hardware, software, APIs, memory, servers, and interfaces, including Apple’s App Store. Because Apple is licensed under Lodsys’ patents to offer such technology to its App Makers, the App Makers are entitled to use this technology free from any infringement claim by Lodsys.

Full letter sent from Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell to Lodsys CEO, Mark Small:

Dear Mr. Small:

I write to you on behalf of Apple Inc. (“Apple”) regarding your recent notice letters to application developers (“App Makers”) alleging infringement of certain patents through the App Makers’ use of Apple products and services for the marketing, sale, and delivery of applications (or “Apps”). Apple is undisputedly licensed to these patent and the Apple App Makers are protected by that license. There is no basis for Lodsys’ infringement allegations against Apple’s App Makers. Apple intends to share this letter and the information set out herein with its App Makers and is fully prepared to defend Apple’s license rights.

Because I believe that your letters are based on a fundamental misapprehension regarding Apple’s license and the way Apple’s products work, I expect that the additional information set out below will be sufficient for you to withdraw your outstanding threats to the App Makers and cease and desist from any further threats to Apple’s customers and partners.

First, Apple is licensed to all four of the patents in the Lodsys portfolio. As Lodsys itself advertises on its website, “Apple is licensed for its nameplate products and services.” See http://www.lodsys.com/blog.html. Under its license, Apple is entitled to offer these licensed products and services to its customers and business partners, who, in turn, have the right to use them.

Second, while we are not privy to all of Lodsys’s infringement contentions because you have chosen to send letters to Apple’s App Makers rather than to Apple itself, our understanding based on the letters we have reviewed is that Lodsys’s infringement allegations against Apple’s App Makers rest on Apple products and services covered by the license. These Apple products and services are offered by Apple to the App Makers to enable them to interact with the users of Apple products—such as the iPad, iPhone, iPod touch and the Apple iOS operating system—through the use or Apple’s App Store, Apple Software Development Kits, and Apple Application Program Interfaces (“APIs”) and Apple servers and other hardware.

The illustrative infringement theory articulated by Lodsys in the letters we have reviewed under Claim 1 of U.S. Patent No. 7,222,078 is based on App Makers’ use of such licensed Apple products and services. Claim 1 claims a user interface that allows two-way local interaction with the user and elicits user feedback. Under your reading of the claim as set out in your letters, the allegedly infringing acts require the use of Apple APIs to provide two-way communication, the transmission of an Apple ID and other services to permit access for the user to the App store, and the use of Apple’s hardware, iOS, and servers.

Claim 1 also claims a memory that stores the results of the user interaction and a communication element to carry those results to a central location. Once again, Apple provides, under the infringement theories set out in your letters, the physical memory in which user feedback is stored and, just as importantly, the APIs that allow transmission of that user feedback to and from the App Store, over an Apple server, using Apple hardware and software. Indeed, in the notice letters to App Makers that we have been privy to, Lodsys itself relies on screenshots of the App Store to purportedly meet this claim element.

Finally, claim 1 claims a component that manages the results from different users and collects those results at the central location. As above, in the notice letters we have seen, Lodsys uses screenshots that expressly identify the App Store as the entity that purportedly collects and manages the results of these user interactions at a central location.

Thus, the technology that is targeted in your notice letters is technology that Apple is expressly licensed under the Lodsys patents to offer to Apple’s App Makers. These licensed products and services enable Apple’s App Makers to communicate with end users through the use of Apple’s own licensed hardware, software, APIs, memory, servers, and interfaces, including Apple’s App Store. Because Apple is licensed under Lodsys’ patents to offer such technology to its App Makers, the App Makers are entitled to use this technology free from any infringement claims by Lodsys.

Through its threatened infringement claims against users of Apple’s licensed technology, Lodsys is invoking patent law to control the post-sale use of these licensed products and methods. Because Lodsys’s threats are based on the purchase or use of Apple products and services licensed under the Agreement, and because those Apple products and services, under the reading articulated in your letters, entirely or substantially embody each of Lodsys’s patents, Lodsys’s threatened claims are barred by the doctrines of patent exhaustion and first sale. As the Supreme Court has made clear, “[t]he authorized sale of an article that substantially embodies a patent exhausts the patent holder’s rights and prevents the patent holder from invoking patent law to control postsale use of the article.” Quanta Computer, Inc. v. LG Elecs., Inc., 553 U.S. 617 (2008).

Therefore, Apple requests that Lodsys immediately withdraw all notice letters sent to Apple App Makers and cease its false assertions that the App Makers’ use of licensed Apple products and services in any way constitute infringement of any Lodsys patent.

Very truly yours,

Bruce Sewell
Senior Vice President & General Counsel
Apple Inc.

Apple Goes in Front of US Senate Regarding Mobile Privacy

Yesterday Google and Apple were both in front of US Senate commitee to answer questions on the “Locationgate” controversy.

The hearing which is titled “Protecting Mobile Privacy: Your Smartphones, Tablets, Cell Phones and Your Privacy” saw Guy L. “Bud” Tribble Apple’s Vice President of Software Technology and Alan Davidson Google’s Director of Public Policy be grilled on why iOS and Android collect location data and where this data is stored.

The hearing can be heard in full on the US Senate website and contains very little that wasn’t answered in Apple’s Q&A, the most telling extract is below.

Frankin: Mr. Tribble, last month I asked Apple in a letter why it was building a comprehensive location database on iPhones and iPads and storing it on peoples’ computers — when they synced up, of course. Apple’s reply to my letter will be added to the record. But this is what Apple CEO Steve Jobs said to the press: “We build a crowd-sourced database of Wi-Fi and cell tower hot spots but those can be over 100 miles away from where you are. Those are not telling you anything about your location.”

Yet in a written statement issued that same week, Apple explained that this very same data will “help your iPhone rapidly and accurately calculate its location.” Or as the Associated Press summarized it “the data help the phone figure out its location, Apple said.”

But Steve Jobs that same week said “those are not telling you anything about your location.”

Mr. Tribble, it does not appear to me that both these statements could be true at the same time. Does this data indicate anything about your location or doesn’t it?

Tribble: Senator, the data that’s stored in the database is the location of as many Wi-Fi hotspots and cellphone towers as we can have. That data does not actually contain — in our databases — any customer information at all. It’s completely anonymous. It’s only about the cellphone towers and the Wi-Fi hotspots. However, when a portion of that database is downloaded onto your phone, you phone also knows which hotspots and cellphone towers it can receive right now. So the combination of the database of “where are those towers and hotspots” plus your phone knowing which ones it can receive right now is how the phone figures out where it is without the GPS.

Apple Gives Developers iOS 4.3 Webkit Source Code

Following a number of complaints about Apple’s seeming unwillingness to release the source code for Webkit in iOS 4.3 Apple has finally given developers access.

Last week, Harald Welte called out Apple for not offering the include LGPL licensed code to developers on its website. In the past following iOS releases Apple has been timely in releasing the code in agreement with the obligations of using the source code.

On Monday Apple finally released the code for Webkit in iOS 4.3.3, the most recent release of iOS for iPhone.

It is unknown why Apple delayed the release of the code, some have speculated that Apple is simply waiting for developer pressure on the company before releasing code despite being obligated to do so.

Apple Releases iOS 4.3.3

Apple has today released iOS 4.3.3 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. The minor iOS update delivers iPod bug fixes and addresses battery life issues. Most notably the update also changes how iPhone and iPads store location information.

As outlined in Apple’s question and answer on the location tracking bug the new software will cease backing up of the database, reduce the size of the database of WiFi and cell towers cached on the phone and delete the cache when location services are turned off.

iOS 4.3.3 is available for iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPad 1 and 2, and third and fourth generation iPod touches. Apple has released iOS 4.2.8 for the CDMA iPhone 4.

Apple Responds to iPhone and iPad Location Data Collection

Steve Jobs Unveils iPhone 4 at WWDC 2010

Steve Jobs Unveils iPhone 4 at WWDC 2010 | Photo by mathieuthouvenin

Apple has today officially responded to growing concern over the subject of location collection on the iPhone in iOS 4.0 and on the iPad 3G. Since iOS 4.0 data is recorded into a database of nearby Wi-Fi and cellular access points used to provide quick location fixes when needed.

Apple has released a Q&A on its website explaining the issue, highlighting that Apple is not tracking the location of iPhones and iPads, and never intends to do so.

The data recorded is sent to Apple in an anonymous and encrypted fashion and it is not possible for the data to be tied to any user but is helpful in gaining a location when requested where GPS signal is hard to obtain.

Apple also said that a number of bugs are at play in the current version of iOS, when location services are turned off it has been discovered that the database continues to grow and this will be addressed. Apple also intends to release a software update that will cease backing up of the database, reduce the size of the database of WiFi and cell towers cached on the phone and delete the cache when location services are turned off.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs has also given a telephone interview to All Things Digital, adding some colour to the issue:

Jobs said that the tech industry hasn’t done a good job of educating users on what has been a fairly complicated issue.

“As new technology comes into the society there is a period of adjustment and education,” Jobs said. “We haven’t as an industry done a very good job educating people I think, as to some of the more subtle things going on here. As such (people) jumped to a lot of wrong conclusions in the last week.”

Jobs also revealed that Apple has been asked to testify by US authorities and will do so but questions whether other phone manufacturers will come under the same scrutiny by the press.

Apple Releases iOS 4.3.2, iOS 4.2.7 for Verizon iPhone

Apple has recently released iOS 4.3.2 for iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPod touch and iPad. The CDMA iPhone 4 has also been updated to version iOS 4.2.7, causing some curiosity as to why the Verizon iPhone remains on a separate software branch.

The iOS update is said to include improvements and bug fixes:

  • Fixes an issue that occasionally caused blank or frozen video during a FaceTime call
  • Fixes an issue that prevented some international users from connecting to 3G networks on iPad Wi-Fi + 3G
  • Contains the latest security updates

iOS 4.3.2 Set to Land With Verizon iPad 2 Connectivity Fix

It is being reported by Boy Genius Report that iOS 4.3.2 is set to land “within the next week or so” and pack a number of key fixes.

The update is said to fix the issues with Verizon iPad 2 connectivity, as well as FaceTime and security fixes. A number of vulnerabilities in WebKit alongside other minor fixes are also said to be included.

Apple Releases iOS 4.3.1

Apple has today released a minor software update for the GSM iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPad 2, iPad, and the third- and fourth-generation iPod touch. iOS 4.3.1 brings several bug fixes and improvements, labelled build number 8G4 the following notes are included:

This update contains improvements and other bug fixes including:

- Fixes an occasional graphics glitch on iPod touch (4th generation)
- Resolves bugs related to activating and connecting to some cellular networks
- Fixes image flicker when using Apple Digital AV Adapter with some TVs
- Resolves an issue authenticating with some enterprise web services